Nanotechnology drug delivery

How is nanotechnology used in drug delivery?

Perhaps the most publicized use of nanotechnology in drug delivery under development is the use of nanoparticles to deliver drugs to cancer cells. Particles are engineered so that they are attracted to diseased cells, which allows direct treatment of those cells.

Which nanoparticles are used in drug delivery?

Nanoparticles used in drug delivery system Chitosan. Chitosan exhibits muco-adhesive properties and can be used to act in the tight epithelial junctions. Alginate. Xanthan gum. Cellulose. Liposomes . Polymeric micelles. Dendrimers . Inorganic nanoparticles.

Why are nanoparticles used in drug delivery?

Due to their small size and large surface area, drug nanoparticles show increase solubility and thus enhanced bioavailability, additional ability to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), enter the pulmonary system and be absorbed through the tight junctions of endothelial cells of the skin (Kohane, 2007).

What is the new drug delivery system?

Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are developed to deliver the required amount of drugs effectively to appropriate target sites and to maintain the desired drug levels. Research in newer DDS is being carried out in liposomes, nanoparticles, niosomes, transdermal drug delivery , implants, microencapsulation, and polymers.

What are the disadvantages of nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology offers the potential for new and faster kinds of computers, more efficient power sources and life-saving medical treatments. Potential disadvantages include economic disruption and possible threats to security, privacy, health and the environment.

Is Nanomedicine being used today?

Nanotechnology in Medicine Application: Drug Delivery One application of nanotechnology in medicine currently being developed involves employing nanoparticles to deliver drugs, heat, light or other substances to specific types of cells (such as cancer cells). Read more about nanomedicine in drug delivery.

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Who is the father of nanomedicine?

Physicist Richard Feynman

What are the types of nanoparticles?

Nanoparticles can be classified into different types according to the size, morphology, physical and chemical properties . Some of them are carbon-based nanoparticles, ceramic nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles , semiconductor nanoparticles , polymeric nanoparticles and lipid-based nanoparticles.

How does drug delivery work?

Drug delivery refers to the technology utilized to present the drug to the desired body site for drug release and absorption, or the subsequent transport of the active ingredients across the biological membranes to the site of action.

How do we use nanoparticles?

Nanoparticles are now being used in the manufacture of scratchproof eyeglasses, crack- resistant paints, anti-graffiti coatings for walls, transparent sunscreens, stain-repellent fabrics, self-cleaning windows and ceramic coatings for solar cells.

What are nanoparticles made of?

The definition given by the European Commission states that the particle size of at least half of the particles in the number size distribution must measure 100 nm or below. Most nanoparticles are made up of only a few hundred atoms.

Why do we need nanoparticles?

Nanoparticles are used increasingly in catalysis to boost chemical reactions. This reduces the quantity of catalytic materials necessary to produce desired results, saving money and reducing pollutants. Nanoscale materials are also being incorporated into a variety of personal care products to improve performance.

What are the 4 drug delivery methods?

Current research on drug delivery systems can be described in four broad categories: routes of delivery, delivery vehicles , cargo, and targeting strategies. Medications can be taken in a variety of ways—by swallowing, by inhalation , by absorption through the skin, or by intravenous injection.

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What are the 8 routes of drug administration?

Oral route. Many drugs can be administered orally as liquids, capsules, tablets, or chewable tablets. Injection routes. Administration by injection (parenteral administration) includes the following routes: Sublingual and buccal routes. Rectal route . Vaginal route. Ocular route. Otic route. Nasal route.

Which drug delivery system has the longest duration of action?

The present limit on duration of rate‐controlled oral products is currently set by the transit of solid dosage forms through the gastrointestinal tract: the longest of the oral delivery system products has a delivery time of 18 h [7].