Explain nanotechnology

What is nanotechnology explain?

Nanotechnology is a field of research and innovation concerned with building ‘things’ – generally, materials and devices – on the scale of atoms and molecules. A nanometre is one-billionth of a metre: ten times the diameter of a hydrogen atom. The diameter of a human hair is, on average, 80,000 nanometres.

What is nanotechnology and how does it work?

Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanometer scale, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this length scale.

What is nanotechnology and why is it important?

Nanotechnology is designed to provide a novel and improved approach to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Since biological processes, including events that lead to the development of cancer, occur on a nanoscale at the surface of and inside cells, nanotechnology offers many tools.

Why do we need nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is helping to considerably improve, even revolutionize, many technology and industry sectors: information technology, homeland security, medicine, transportation, energy, food safety, and environmental science, among many others.

Who uses nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is being used in developing countries to help treat disease and prevent health issues. The umbrella term for this kind of nanotechnology is Nano-medicine. Nanotechnology is also being applied to or developed for application to a variety of industrial and purification processes.

Why is nanotechnology unique?

Nanotechnology is not simply working at ever smaller dimensions; rather, working at the nanoscale enables scientists to utilize the unique physical, chemical, mechanical, and optical properties of materials that naturally occur at that scale.

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How is nanotechnology used in everyday life?

The average person already encounters nanotechnology in a range of everyday consumer products – nanoparticles of silver are used to deliver antimicrobial properties in hand washes, bandages, and socks, and zinc or titanium nanoparticles are the active UV-protective elements in modern sunscreens.

How nanotechnology affects our lives?

It is also a rapidly expanding field. Scientists and engineers are having great success making materials at the nanoscale to take advantage of enhanced properties such as higher strength, lighter weight, increased electrical conductivity, and chemical reactivity compared to their larger-scale equivalents.

What are the dangers of using nanotechnology?

What are the possible dangers of nanotechnology? Nanoparticles may damage the lungs. Nanoparticles can get into the body through the skin , lungs and digestive system. The human body has developed a tolerance to most naturally occurring elements and molecules that it has contact with.

What are the negative effects of nanotechnology?

Materials which by themselves are not very harmful could be toxic if they are inhaled in the form of nanoparticles. The effects of inhaled nanoparticles in the body may include lung inflammation and heart problems .

How is nanotechnology created?

Two main approaches are used in nanotechnology . In the “bottom-up” approach, materials and devices are built from molecular components which assemble themselves chemically by principles of molecular recognition. In the “top-down” approach, nano-objects are constructed from larger entities without atomic-level control.

Is nanotechnology safe for humans?

Health Risks Of Nanotechnology : How Nanoparticles Can Cause Lung Damage, And How The Damage Can Be Blocked. However, concerns are growing that it may have toxic effects, particularly damage to the lungs. Although nanoparticles have been linked to lung damage, it has not been clear how they cause it.

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Why Nanotechnology is the future?

In the future , nanotechnology could also enable objects to harvest energy from their environment. New nano-materials and concepts are currently being developed that show potential for producing energy from movement, light, variations in temperature, glucose and other sources with high conversion efficiency.